University Inn and Resort

A FUN PLACE TO STAY

 


Gooding College was established in 1917 and remained a pillar of education in Southern Idaho until 1938. 


The school started with land, from Frank Gooding, and $267,000.00 from the community of Gooding. At the peak of enrollment, in 1928, the college had 209 students. 

At the time Gooding College was the only Higher Education in Idaho between Caldwell and Pocatello, and the only degree offered was a Bachelor of Arts. From 1917 through 1935 the President of the College was C.W. Tenney. 


The building being restored was named after him, Tenney Hall, and the only building left on the site of the collage campus today. As late as 1931 the Gooding College was called “A valuable asset to Southern Idaho”. 

Within seven years of that being said it was shut down. After 21 years of operation the buildings on the campus were given to Conference Claimants Board of The Idaho Conference of the Methodist Church, which had loaned money to keep the school operating. 

In 1941 the property was given to the state of Idaho for the 
development of a Tuberculosis Hospital, which opened in 1946. The TB Hospital, as most of the community knows us as today, was, at the time, one of the most advanced Hospitals for TB in the United States.

Now, the building and grounds are host the University Inn.

Architect: Tourtellotte & Hummel

1911-1938 school  Methodist

In 1920 the building was erected to serve as the dormitory for the Gooding College founded in 1917. The college served students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree until 1938. Because the Methodist Church had provided substantial funds to keep the school going, the buildings were donated to the church when the school closed.

In 1941 the Methodist Church gave the building to the state of Idaho for the development of a tuberculosis hospital, however, shortages of equipment and personnel during World War II delayed the opening of the hospital until May 1947. The hospital was in operation until 1976. After the building was abandoned, Idaho State legislators have wondered what to do with the building and there have been unsuccessful attempts to have the building demolished. Recently the building was purchased by Gary Hannon, who refurbished a small section of the historic building to house guests at the "Get Inn". He offers eight guestrooms, which had previously served as the nurses' dorms when the Idaho State Tuberculosis Hospital was in operation.

It was purchased in 2002 by the Tony Woodford